NSA Phone Data Collection Is Set to Shut Down

Credit: One News Page Staff- Published on March 6, 2019
by 👨‍💻 Simon Baxendale

In the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks, the US government and National Security Agency put a number of new measures in place to help protect citizens across the states. However, some of these methods were met with controversy. It has emerged over the years that the NSA has been able to access and analyze phone calls and texts between millions of people – and it has all been thanks to the Patriot Act of 2001. This legislation helped the NSA access data from supposedly private communications across the US. It was famously brought to public scrutiny in 2013, after whistleblower Edward Snowden made some of the Agency’s actions known.

In the years since, an act was put through Congress to require that all access to such data only be granted with an accompanying court order. That order is about to expire – but according to reports, it seems the NSA is ready to give up on collecting this type of data altogether.

The current Trump administration may not be expected to renew the data collection system, according to congressional aide Luke Murray. CNET advises Murray confirmed the White House had not been making use of such collection for some time. “The administration actually hasn’t been using it for the past six months because of problems with the way in which that information was collected,” the aide confirmed.

“I’m not actually certain that the administration will want to start that back up given where they’ve been in the past six months.”

Murray is a senior aide and security advisor to Kevin McCarty, minority leader of the House of Representatives. While he is regarded as a prominent figure behind the scenes, there is yet to be any comment from either the White House or the NSA on such claims. The NSA, in fact, has declined to comment altogether.


NSA May Be Ending Contested Surveillance Program [video]

The way in which data is accessed and collected has changed immensely over the past decade. With the public more aware of matters regarding privacy than ever before, it is now a very different climate as far as data crunching is concerned. Big firms are being taken to task over the data they hold on us and how they are using it – meaning could the same apply to our government agencies? With the UK having controversially passed a law in recent years to request internet service providers collecting internet browsing history, there may well be a few years of snooping left in the balance.


Credit: BeetTV - Affiliate
Published on March 6, 2019 -  03:28
How Brands Can Get A Handle On Their Data: 4INFO’s Jenkins
If data really is the new oil, how do you know where to drill? And how do you extract and refine the black stuff, once found? Most marketers now understand the importance and the power of acquiring, segmenting and targeting against distinct audience data characteristics. But, as they jump in, many skip over the strategy part. That is according to one ad ad-tech vendor's boss. "You need a data strategy,"says Tim Jenkins, 4INFO CEO, in this video interview with Beet.TV, at the Beet.TV Identity Forum, where he was a speaker. "How sophisticated and complex completely depends on your business, but what we find with most brands is it's the number one thing they lack, a real understanding of data in general, how to use it, but more importantly, what data they have." The application of consumer data in marketing has remained one of the hottest topics in the last couple of years. New regulatory limits on indiscriminate ad targeting have accelerated the coming-together of ad-tech and mar-tech. Now there is a growing realization of the importance of customer or prospect profile data. That places a greater emphasis on CRM. "What we encourage brands to do at the outset is to take a step back, understand the data they have before they start buying a lot of third party data, and trying to put together, stitch together data assets to go activate in this new media model," Jenkins adds. "Understand what data you have, customer data, how it relates to your objectives." 4INFO uses what it calls Connected Identity Maps and its Bullseye ID, which starts by mapping a mobile device to a home address, a match key for other devices, too. But the company has also branched out to other platforms, like the new wave of TV devices. Jenkins says 4INFO supplies Connected Identity Maps to “a number of large players in both the addressable and OTT television space”.

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