Argentines flee crisis for jobs abroad

Credit: Reuters - Politics
Published on August 25, 2019 - Duration: 02:33s

Argentines flee crisis for jobs abroad

Argentine executives and graduates shocked by President Mauricio Macri's drubbing in elections this month have begun calling and emailing in droves in search of work in Brazil, Chile and Colombia, head hunters and visa advisers told Reuters.

Yahaira Jacquez has more.


Argentines flee crisis for jobs abroad

Argentine executives and graduates shocked after President Mauricio Macri suffered a crushing defeat in elections last week, have begun to seriously consider leaving the country.

Head hunters and visa advisers told Reuters argentines are calling and emailing in droves, searching for jobs in Chile, Brazil and Colombia.

Some like Agustina Bertuzzi have already made the move.

SOUNDBITE (SPANISH) AGUSTINA BERTUZZI, CONSULTORA ROBERT WALTERS.

SAYING" "I came (to Chile) because of the economy.

The political situation in Argentina is not good at the moment.

The 29-year-old public relations graduate moved to Santiago, Chile two months ago and says many seeking to follow in her steps are seeking her advice.

SOUNDBITE (SPANISH) AGUSTINA BERTUZZI, CONSULTORA ROBERT WALTERS.

SAYING" "A lot ask me how life is here, what the salaries are like, the cost of living, because they are obviously thinking about a change." Executive search specialists say they've received a deluge of resumes at their offices in countries like Chile and Colombia, reaching a peak after Macri lost ground to his leftist opponent, Alberto Fernandez, in the primary election, causing the peso to plummet.

Reuters correspondent Marina Lammertyn is in Buenos Aires.

(SOUNDBITE) (ENGLISH) MARINA LAMMERTYN SAYING: "Argentina's economy already had problems. Poverty is up 35 percent and inflation is up 55 percent.

After the peso crashed, some Argentines saw that as a preview of what's to come.." Despite Macri's struggles to turn the economy around, investors see the Fernandez - now the frontrunner ahead of the general election in October - as a riskier prospect.

Fernandez's running mate is former president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, which has sparked fear the country will return to "Kirchnerismo", a time when Argentina had currency controls and heavy-handed state involvement.

(SOUNDBITE) (SPANISH) GUILLERMO GALIA, SAYING: "I want my children to have a good future, and today I am not seeing it in Argentina." When Guillermo Galia was offered a job in Italy a few weeks ago, he said he jumped at the chance.

(SOUNDBITE) (SPANISH) GUILLERMO GALIA, SAYING: If the situation doesn't change and we continue living backwards in a country where the principles and values I want for my children are completely different, I'd prefer to stay in Italy."

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